Search Query: history of cia wars

Search Results

You searched for "history of cia wars" and here's what we found ...


What About the Unprovoked U.S. Aggression Against Iraq?

by
Referring to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, an editorial in Saturday’s Washington Post exclaims that Ukraine’s “struggle is also a crucible for Europe and an assault against the most basic precept on which the Western system rests: the impermissibility of unprovoked wars of aggression.”  In a follow-up editorial today, the Post calls for an international tribunal to try Vladimir Putin and his "henchmen” for waging a “war of aggression” against Ukraine. The Post quotes the Nuremberg tribunal: “To initiate a war of aggression … is not only an international crime; it is the supreme international crime differing only from other war crimes in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole.” What befuddles me, however, is why the Post doesn’t also condemn President George W. Bush and his “henchmen” for their unprovoked invasion of Iraq and, further, why the Post doesn’t call for a Nuremberg-type tribunal for Bush and his “henchman.” ...

How We Got a National-Security Police State, Part 3

by
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 On February 26, 1993, terrorists detonated a truck bomb in the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City. While the bombing did not bring down the Twin Towers, as the terrorists intended, it did kill six people and injured over a thousand. That terrorist attack was no different in principle from the one that would succeed in bringing down the WTC some eight years later. One of the terrorists involved in the 1993 attack was a Pakistani man named Ramzi Yousef. In 1995, he was arrested in Pakistan and then extradited to the United States. Given that the terrorist attack on the WTC was a criminal offense under U.S. law, Yousef was tried in a U.S. District Court, convicted, and sentenced to two life sentences plus 240 years. At his sentencing hearing, there was no doubt that Yousef was a very angry man. This is what he stated in part to ...

My Favorite Period in History

by
My favorite period of history is the United States in the years 1870-1915.  Why? Because it is the freest period in the history of man.  Was it a libertarian panacea? Nope. There were, in fact, infringements on liberty, such as the violation of women’s rights, the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1870, compulsory school-attendance laws in Massachusetts, and others. [POST-PUBLICATION NOTE: A reader wrote me and suggested that I should also point out that Jim Crow laws, which, needless to say, where a major infringement on liberty, began during this era. I agree with him. Also, another reader suggested I should make the period end in 1912, given that the Sixteenth Amendment and the Federal Reserve Act were enacted in 1913. I think his point is valid also. I probably should also mention that the Sherman Anti-Trust Act was enacted in 1870 and that the first immigration-control act was enacted in 1884. Like I say, this ...