Search Query: sacks

Search Results

You searched for "sacks" and here's what we found ...


The Black Hole of Higher Education

by
ONE OF THE GREAT growth industries in America in the second half of the 20th century was higher education. Prior to World War II, there were only 1.5 million students enrolled in some 1,700 colleges and universities. Spending per student was about $450. By the late 1990s, the student population had grown to 14.4 million students, enrolled in 3,700 colleges and universities. Spending had grown to roughly $15,000 per student. Federal and state governments lavish subsidies on higher education. The Feds provide billions in college loans and grants; the states do their part with low tuition that covers only a fraction of the cost of providing the educational services. (Vermont is the least profligate, with tuition covering 78 percent of the cost. California is the most profligate, with tuition covering only 16 percent of the cost.) The explosive growth of higher ...

Hornberger’s Blog, March 2008

by
Monday, March 31, 2008 Attacking Basra on the Way to Iran? by Jacob G. Hornberger As most everyone knows, since last week the Iraqi government, supported by U.S. troops and warplanes, has been engaged in fierce battles for control of Basra. The question, of course, is: Why now, and why is control over Basra so important? We can only hope that the answer does not lie in any plans that President Bush might have to bomb Iran. As things stand right now, the Shiite leader Moqtada al-Sadr and his fighters control Basra. Al-Sadr is closely aligned with the Shiite regime in Iran. In fact, one could easily argue that matters in Basra are effectively controlled by Iran. What would an Iraqi-U.S. assault on Basra have to do with a possible plan to bomb Iran? The answer is found in a recent article entitled “Operation Cassandra” by William S. Lind, an expert on military affairs. Lind outlines the danger of a ...

Hornberger’s Blog, March 2008

by
Monday, March 31, 2008 Attacking Basra on the Way to Iran? by Jacob G. Hornberger As most everyone knows, since last week the Iraqi government, supported by U.S. troops and warplanes, has been engaged in fierce battles for control of Basra. The question, of course, is: Why now, and why is control over Basra so important? We can only hope that the answer does not lie in any plans that President Bush might have to bomb Iran. As things stand right now, the Shiite leader Moqtada al-Sadr and his fighters control Basra. Al-Sadr is closely aligned with the Shiite regime in Iran. In fact, one could easily argue that matters in Basra are effectively controlled by Iran. What would an Iraqi-U.S. assault on Basra have to do with a possible plan to bomb Iran? The answer is found in a recent article entitled “Operation Cassandra” by William S. Lind, an expert on military affairs. Lind outlines the danger of a ...