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Why Germans Supported Hitler, Part 2

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The most remarkable part of the movie Sophie Scholl: The Final Days is the courtroom scene, which is based on recently discovered German archives. Sophie and her brother Hans, along with their friend Christoph Probst, stand before the infamous Roland Freisler, presiding judge of the People’s Court, whom Hitler had immediately sent to Munich after the Gestapo’s arrest of the Scholls and Probst. The People’s Court had been established by Hitler as part of the government’s war on terrorism after the terrorist firebombing of the German parliament building. Displeased with the independence of the judiciary in the trials of the suspected Reichstag terrorists, Hitler had set up the People’s Court to ensure that terrorists and traitors would receive the “proper” verdict and punishment. Judicial proceedings were conducted in secret for reasons of national security, which is why Freisler threw Hans’s and Sophie’s parents out of the courtroom when they tried to ...

Ford’s Legacy: Lawless Government

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The death of former President Gerald Ford unleashed a tidal wave of bathos and political bunkum across the land. Ford was far more exalted in death than he had been during his time in office. Slate’s Timothy Noah critically noted, Within the narrow confines of Permanent Washington — the journalists, lobbyists, and congressional lifers who are the city’s avatars of centrism and continuity — Ford is considered the beau ideal of American leadership. Washingtonians praise pliable politicians for not being “ideologues.” In other words, they don’t object to the abuse of power. Ford is portrayed as a friend of good government, but in reality he was a friend of Leviathan — and this is what cinched his good reputation in Washington. On a personal level, Gerald Ford was one of the least venal presidents of modern times. ...

Ford’s Legacy: Lawless Government

by
The death of former President Gerald Ford unleashed a tidal wave of bathos and political bunkum across the land. Ford was far more exalted in death than he had been during his time in office. Slate’s Timothy Noah critically noted, Within the narrow confines of Permanent Washington — the journalists, lobbyists, and congressional lifers who are the city’s avatars of centrism and continuity — Ford is considered the beau ideal of American leadership. Washingtonians praise pliable politicians for not being “ideologues.” In other words, they don’t object to the abuse of power. Ford is portrayed as a friend of good government, but in reality he was a friend of Leviathan — and this is what cinched his good reputation in Washington. On a personal level, Gerald Ford was one of the least venal presidents of modern times. ...