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The Power to Declare War — Who Speaks for the Constitution? Part 1

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Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 When presidents lose domestic support, they invariably look overseas for crises to solve. President Clinton is no different. After the Republicans swept Congress, he immediately flew off to the Pacific for a series of meetings with foreign leaders. Aides predict that he will continue to pay greater attention to foreign policy, where he is able to operate with fewer restrictions from a hostile Congress. But foreign policy means more than just international summits. It also means war, as is evident from the Clinton administration's continuing attempt to push America, through the NATO alliance, into a larger role in the Balkans imbroglio. So far, President Bill Clinton has undertaken or considered military action in Bosnia, Haiti, Korea, and Somalia. At no point has he indicated a willingness to involve Congress in the decision-making process. To the contrary, in late 1993 he stated: "I would strenuously oppose attempts to encroach on the President's foreign policy ...

Book Review: Days of Infamy

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Days of Infamy: MacArthur, Roosevelt, Churchill — The Shocking Truth Revealed by John Costello (New York: Pocket Books, 1994); 448 pages; $24. John Costello is a distinguished historian who has uncovered fascinating new evidence on a wide number of topics. Two of his previous works, Mask of Treachery: Spies, Lies, Buggery & Betrayal (1988) and Deadly Illusions (1993), unearthed previously unknown information about Soviet espionage in Britain and the United States. In his recent book, Days of Infamy , Mr. Costello turns his historian's eye to the events leading up to the disaster at Pearl Harbor. An essential key for understanding the disaster on December 7, 1941, he argues, is the change in U.S. Pacific military strategy during that year. Before 1941, the first line of defense had been viewed as the Hawaiian Islands, with the Philippine Islands considered an indefensible military burden. But in the early fall of 1941, the secretary of war, Henry Stimson, convinced Roosevelt that ...

Covering the Map of the World — The Half-Century Legacy of the Yalta Conference, Part 4

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Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 As we have seen, Roosevelt approached his meetings with Stalin with a determination to make friends and use the Red Czar of Soviet Russia as his partner in creating a Global New Deal. The nature of the Soviet regime and its master did not bother FDR in the least. In 1940, when Congressman Martin Dies told Roosevelt of his concerns about possible Soviet agents in prominent positions in the federal government, FDR replied: "I do not believe in Communism any more than you do, but there is nothing wrong with the Communists in this country. Several of the best friends I have are Communists." As for the Soviet Union, FDR told Congressman Dies: "I look upon Russia as our strongest ally in the years to come. ...