Search Query: Peace

Search Results

You searched for "Peace" and here's what we found ...


The Great Multiplier

by
Through foresight, imagination, and individual initiative, man develops tools and facilities which expand his efforts and enable him to produce things which would not otherwise be possible. This is an outstanding difference between man and animal, just as it is an outstanding difference between civilization and barbarism. Progress toward better living would never have been possible, except through the development of tools to extend the uses of human energy-tools that harness the forces of nature as a substitute for muscular effort.... The introduction of tools marked the beginning of man's progress in three important directions: (1) More effective use of energy; (2) Specialization of effort; and (3) Advances in human co-operation and improvements in living conditions, through the peaceful exchange of goods and services. At one time or another, every conceivable form of authority has been tried, but each has failed for the simple reasons that: (1) Only an individual human being can generate human energy; and (2) Only an individual ...

Individual Liberty and Civil Society

by
In 1819, the French classical liberal, Benjamin Constant, delivered a lecture in Paris entitled, "The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with that of the Modems." He drew his audience's attention to the fact that in the world of ancient Greece, "the aim of the ancients was the sharing of power among the citizens of the fatherland: this is what they called liberty. the citizen, almost always sovereign in public affairs, was a slave in all his private relations. As a citizen, he decided peace and war, as a private individual, he was constrained, watched and repressed in all his movements; as a member of the collective body, he interrogated, dismissed, condemned, beggared, exiled, or sentenced to death his magistrates and superiors; as a subject of the collective body he could be deprived of his status, stripped of his privileges, banished, put to death, by the discretionary will of the whole to which he belonged.... The ancients, as ...

Individual Liberty and Civil Society

by
In 1819, the French classical liberal, Benjamin Constant, delivered a lecture in Paris entitled, "The Liberty of the Ancients Compared with that of the Modems." He drew his audience's attention to the fact that in the world of ancient Greece, "the aim of the ancients was the sharing of power among the citizens of the fatherland: this is what they called liberty. the citizen, almost always sovereign in public affairs, was a slave in all his private relations. As a citizen, he decided peace and war, as a private individual, he was constrained, watched and repressed in all his movements; as a member of the collective body, he interrogated, dismissed, condemned, beggared, exiled, or sentenced to death his magistrates and superiors; as a subject of the collective body he could be deprived of his ...